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On today's show Jeff and Dan get out into the great wide open to have a chat outside about a grab bag of topics.  We discuss some books we've read recently, and more importantly, get to a number of questions that YOU the listener have asked over the past few months.  It's an informal show- maybe not for a first time listener, but maybe it's for you,  the fan of the show (that may or may not be referenced on this episode) (See links below for some of the books we reference)

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On the 50th anniversary of the March on Montgomery from Selma Dan and good friend of the show, Dr. Kristen Koenig, and a group of students flew to Alabama and made the trek to Selma to commemorate the event and experience a bit of history.  Needless to say, it was an amazing event.  On today's show we invited Kristen, and 4 of the students that traveled to Selma to come talk about their experience.  We discuss the history of the Selma march and Civil Rights, our experience as mostly upper Middle Class Californians in the deep south commemorating something that we perhaps thought was remote from own experience.  Now, if you are of a conservative stripe (like Dan!) you might be surprised to hear our take on Obama's speech as well as what we found to be one of the most powerful moments of the weekend.  The show is released, as always, on Monday at 5pm.

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ClickHERE for the PBS documentary on Youtube

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Click HERE to order the book we reference on the show

 
 
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Shibboleth: n. A word or a way of speaking or behaving which shows that a person belongs to a particular group.  We have often talked about how we define and understand ourselves and our community.  One way this has been done is by using certain words or phrases.  A shibboleth (which has its roots in a particularly clever, but bloody, episode in the Ancient Near East) is a kind of code used to define the "other" by  exposing (or understanding) their ignorance of something.  Do we have modern shibboleths in religion, politics, and culture?  And how to we reconcile being part of an "insider" group with having an inquiring or 'open' mind?  
We begin this show talking about Dan's upcoming trip to Selma (we will delve into this on a later episode), the Civil War and then about our identities we crete for ourselves by using shibboleths. Enjoy the show!  

 
 
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Whoa! Maybe the picture here on the left is a little much.  But on today's show we talk about ISIS on today's podcast with Dr. Uwe Simon-Netto (International columnist, Faithful Mask's Founder and former Religion Editor for United Press International) and the images that have accompanied (or failed to accompany) some of the more horrific stories regarding the atrocities in the Middle East.  And even as we considered whether or not to use this picture here, we realized that this is part of the point Dr. Siemon-Netto makes on the show, has recently made in an article, and more importantly: made about the Vietnam War 40 years ago.  This podcast was recorded by a professional video recording team (we'll link to the video when it is up) because of the timeliness of the story and a crossover with the printing of the 3rd edition of Uwe's book.  You may have heard him talk about his book, about his time as a reporter in Vietnam, and if you have, you will hear a few more stories.  But we also have Uwe talk about the modern Middle East, persecution, cultural absurdity and the power of images.  It's a sobering show.  You may not want to listen to this one with young children around (as the descriptions of a few instances are a little grizzly).  Nevertheless, enjoy the show.

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On today's show we talk about Carl Jung, The Police, Introversion and Extroversion.  We sit down with Psychologist Dr. Jenny Cosgrove to discuss personality theory and its implications for understanding ourselves and others.  As usual, we careen onto various paths and somehow get into Feminism and Virginia Slims, but Dr. Cosgrove brought her material and learns us some important things about optimizing our situations in light of, and in spite of our personality types.

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Don't worry, we're not giving up this show.  But we are talking about ways in which giving something up for a time might be good for us.ust days after Valentine's Day, we ask what's up with Lent? Is it worth giving a shot?  Even if we aren't Roman Catholic?  Or even religous at all?  Jeff explains why he has recently changed his favorite holiday from Ash Wednesday to an unlikely day on the calendar (for him).  Dan goes deep into major artists in popular culture, like REM and the Pixies.  Listen to find out how (or whether) this all fits together.


Click here for a direct download.

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A special Valentine's Day episode! With one of our favorite guests, sociologist Dr. Kristen Koenig.  On this Valentine's day special Dr. Koenig brings her valentines day cheer by deconstructing our modern idea of love as we discuss the distinction between intimacy and lust, the idea of "soul mates", and basically every other idea you'll find on a valentine's day card.  But don't worry!  We don't leave you in despair, but rather reconstruct love without the modern day trappings.  We tell a personal story or two about relationships gone bad, and how both single folk and couples might think about the nature of true love. Happy Valentine's Day, enjoy the bonus show, and we'll catch you again at our regular Monday slot with a brand new show.
Click HERE for the link to the questionnaire Dr. Koenig references on the show

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Click to buy the song "Our Way to Fall" by Yo La Tengo- the love song Dan talks about, and is played during the break
 
 
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Obi-Wan may not be our only hope, but we're sure running out of things to cheer us up after our podcast on anti-wisdom a few weeks ago.  On this episode we talk about the virtue of hope in the penultimate (present) world.  We might be down about the economy, virtues in the public square, general government or things closer to home.  Yet, hope abides.  Why?  Do we have an obligation to hold out hope, or can we move on from what we deem lost causes.  This might be one of our cheeriest and most "practical" shows to date. Enjoy! 

 
 
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The name of this show came from some line of conversation with our guest, poet and travel writer Jenn Koiter.  We talk about poetry, her travel writing and her journey that led her to live in both Los Angeles and India (it's kind of like Julia Roberts in "Eat, Pray, Love", except, not at all).  Jenn reads a few short poems and spends time rapping with us about stereotypes of the "great white hope" in impoverished nations and how to try and help out in ugly situations, even when it feels like (or actually is the case) that you are doing very little.  Like some of our shows with guests, we have a great time freewheeling and letting the conversation flow organically. Dig this one, we really did.

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Start your week out right by thinking about the giant gulf between yourself and economic stability! Actually, that's not the point of this show.  It's also not a "how to save your money" show.  We're not even sure if we go with Ancient Indian, Greek or modern sages on the use of money to make money.
How should we think about money in the context of virtue and living in a society where debt seems almost inevitable.  Whether it is a home, car, college or credit card it seems that we are indebted to someone.  Many ancient texts forbade usury (interest?) and warned about taking on debt (or lending).  Come along with us as we run through the ancient world, the first banks and the two of us playing with nuanced ways to think about handling what little money we might have.  We are not economists, nor personal financial advisors.  Rather just a philosopher/theologian and historian using our primary fields to deal with the ethics of making and using money. We riff on characters from Aristotle to Marx to John Winthrop, the DeMedici's and some ideas we've found helpful.