Ep: 128 Missions to Hawaiians and Native Americans with Clarence De Lude III and Tim Norton

Explore the history and complexities of historical and contemporary interactions between Christian missions and indigenous cultures. Here's another conversation about our theme: the wrong side of history, but also a turn toward possibilities and a way to get on track.  Spoiler: the answer is love.  But you'll probably need to hear the whole interview to accept that sort of answer without scoffing that such a claim is anything more than a hippy dream.  We don't cover all the bases; after all, this is a vast subject.  But we learn some good stuff here, and hope you will find it stimulating. 


Clarence De Lude III  is a Native Hawaiian, and descendent of Hewahewa, the Kahuna Nui of Kamehameha I who overthrew the old religious system and burned the old temples shortly before missionaries arrived. He serves the Native Hawaiian people on the island of O’ahu, the third largest and most densely populated island comprising the state. Having received his master’s in Lutheran education and serving many years as vice-principal, Clarence is now enrolled in the Cross-Cultural Ministry Center (CMC) Program at Concordia University, Irvine, Calif., leading to ordination.

Tim Norton and his family serve the Navajo Nation – the largest Native nation both in terms of population and area of more than 25,000 square miles. Tim works with Louise Lee (Navajo), who also serves with Lutheran Indian Ministries at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, Navajo, N.M. Tim is enrolled in the Cross-Cultural Ministry Center (CMC) Program at Concordia University, Irvine, Calif., leading to ordination.

Whatever we inherit from the fortunate
We have taken from the defeated
What they had to leave us—a symbol:
A symbol perfected in death.
And all shall be well and
All manner of thing shall be well
By the purification of the motive
In the ground of our beseeching.
T. S. Eliot, "Little Gidding"